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What is the Joint Code of Practice and how does it relate to Temporary Protection Materials? - Updated June 2016

Posted in: Help & Advice Flame Retardant Products Date: 06 Nov 2011
flame-retardant-certification

Working in the Construction or Building industry, you may have heard of the “Joint Code of Practice” but may not be 100% sure what it is and how it may impact your procurement of temporary protection materials.  You may not be aware but compliance with the joint code of practice is a requirement by insurance companies, and by ensuring you procure LPCB and/or Certifire approved products you may benefit your organisation and help to save thousands or even millions of pounds. This article aims to explain exactly what the Joint Code of Practice is, how you could benefit and where to find Joint Code of Practice approved products.

 

The Joint Code of Practice on the protection from Fire on Construction Sites and Buildings Undergoing Renovation’, first published in 1992 is currently in its ninth edition and was last updated in October 2015. The Joint Code of Practice was originally published in response to two significant fires that resulted in a combined loss in excess of £150 million. Based on these significant loses insurers started to question whether the provision of insurance for construction sites could continue economically.

The objective of ‘the Code’ is the prevention of fire on construction sites. The code applies to all stages of construction, prior to and during, including off-site elements such as procurement and design, ending at the completed structure. The scope of the code applies to contracts with a contract value in excess of £2.5m, but also applies to smaller projects forming part of larger value projects. The code also stipulates that on projects where the risk of fire is high, then these thresholds should be reduced.

We would advise readers who are involved in the procurement process on construction projects to purchase a copy of The Joint Code of Practice on the Protection from Fire of Construction Sites and Buildings Undergoing Renovation. The FPA sell copies of the Joint Code of Practice at the FPA online shop.

How the Code applies to Temporary Covering Materials

 "Where flexible protective covering materials are used, these must conform to the requirements of the LPCB's Loss Prevention Standard LPS 1207: Fire requirements for protective covering materials (ref. 13) or equivalent standard (for example, ref. 14). The materials shall be manufactured in accordance with a quality assurance and certification programme, and the manufacturer shall be certified by a third-party approval body accredited by the United Kingdom Accreditation Service. The relevant approval mark shall be printed on the material."

"When flexible materials are used to clad scaffolding, these materials must conform to the requirements of LPS 1215: Flammability requirements and tests for LPCB approval of scaffolding materials (ref. 15) or equivalent standard (for example, ref. 16). The material shall be manufactured in accordance with a quality assurance and certification programme, and the manufacturer shall be certified by a third-party approval body accredited by the United Kingdom Accreditation Service. The relevant approval mark shall be printed on the material.".


How do you know if a product is approved to the LPS 1207, LPS 1215 Flame Retardant Certification standards or the joint code of practice recognised equivalent standard ‘Certifire’?

Materials that meet the above criteria must be printed with the relevant approval mark together with the manufacturer’s certificate number as illustrated below:

Flame Retardant Stamps

View all of Protec’s LPCB and Certifire approved products

In future blogs, we will be telling you more about the testing processes for both LPCB standards LPS1207 and LPS1215, and we’ll also be drawing your attention to the difference between the LPCB standards and some other standards which you may have been introduced to which unfortunately do not assure compliance with the Joint Code of Practice. Buyer Beware!

Article tags: Health and safety

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